handwriting · slice of life · vocabulary development

My name is not Mommy.

“Before we learn w, let’s practice the last slanted lowercase letter we learned: y,” I declared.

“But I already know how to write a lowercase y. See?”

Ari crammed a lowercase y between the midline and the baseline. Without an audible I-told-you-so, I modeled the way the slant-right went from the midline to the baseline and then the slant-left went below the baseline.

“Oh yeah!” he said remembering. He proceeded to print lowercase y several times on his dry-erase board.

“W, next!” he said.

“Not so fast. I’d like to practice writing some words with a lowercase y. Now, your name doesn’t have a lowercase y in it, but my first name does. It may not sound like a y is at the end of it, but there is.”

Nothing.

“Do you know what my first name is?”

Ari stared at me blankly. Then his face lit up, “Shubitz!”

Yes, I did make him write my name afterward!

“That’s my last name. What’s my first name?” I asked.

“Schaefer,” he replied.

“That’s your last name. What’s my first name?”

“Mommy?” he said.

MOMMY!?!??! This kid knows my cell phone number. he knows our address. I spent so much time teaching him these things — and making sure he knew my last name was different than his — that I didn’t realize he didn’t know my first name!

“It’s Stacey,” I replied. I wrote it on my dry-erase board and showed him, letter-by-letter, how to spell my first name.

“Oh, yeah! I knew that.

Nice try, but you didn’t, kiddo.

Head over to Two Writing Teachers for more slice of life stories.

16 thoughts on “My name is not Mommy.

  1. It’s so interesting that this is something we don’t always think to make sure our children know! My daughter called me “Wisa” for the longest time after she found out my name is Lisa. 🙂 I think I would like having Ari in my class someday.

  2. What a great memory to capture! It’s so funny sometimes when we realize our kids don’t know something we assumed they did. I like the way you ended the piece with inner dialogue.

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